Exhibits Red River Hogs White Tiger Elephants of Asia Proboscis Monkey Free-Ranging Orang Utan Pygmy Hippo Otter Tapir Sun Bear Chimpanzee Sungei Buaya Naked Mole Rat
Zones Frozen Tundra Wild Africa Fragile Forest Australasia Great Rift Valley of Ethiopia Treetops Trail Gibbon Island Primate Kingdom Reptile Garden Tortoise Shell-ter Tropical Crops & Orchid Garden

Primate Kingdom

Singapore Zoo has a total of 39 species of primates, of which a large number of them call the Primate Kingdom home. Wonder why it’s called Primate Kingdom? Because each primate species has its own island, with a landscaping of trees that might as well be castles from where these tree-dwellers rule. Who said you needed to be the king of the jungle to have your own kingdom?

Tall trees, long wild grasses, gingers, palms and bamboo are used to recreate the lush rainforest of their natural habitat. The Zoo’s famous ‘open’ concept flows through this zone as only moats are used to separate the primates from visitors. These moats are filled with various species of fish, the most impressive being the fearsome South American arapaima!

Get down to monkey business as you trek through this zone. These frisky primates will leave you amazed by their intelligence and have you in stitches with their amusing antics. Watch out for the free-ranging Javan langurs too who reside amongst the treetops here. You might just spot some delicate brown faces peeking at you from the treetops above.

Don’t miss the Primate Kingdom token feeding session at 11.00pm and 2.00pm daily too!

 

Lion-tailed Macaque

The macaques’ name comes from the tuft on their tails and their beautiful silvery mane that resembles a lion...

read more

Lion-tailed Macaque

The macaques’ name comes from the tuft on their tails and their beautiful silvery mane that resembles a lion. Another impressive feature of the lion-tailed macaques is that they have cheek pouches to store food and these allow it to gather a large amount of food in a short time, reducing its exposure to predators. The greatest threat to their safety is habitat destruction.

hide


 

Black and White Colobus Monkey

Colobus monkeys once were thought to be abnormal because they have no thumb or only a small stub...

read more

Black and White Colobus Monkey

Colobus monkeys once were thought to be abnormal because they have no thumb or only a small stub where the thumb would usually be. This arboreal adaptation however helps them achieve amazing speeds through the trees. Observe them in action as they hook their four fingers for rapid navigation among the branches.

hide


 

Patas Monkey

The patas monkey is probably the fastest runner of all primates. Reaching top speeds of 55 kilometres...

read more

Patas Monkey

The patas monkey is probably the fastest runner of all primates. Reaching top speeds of 55 kilometres per hour, you might miss them if you blink! Being ground-dwelling monkeys, they have no qualms of having the arboreal black and white colobus monkeys as housemates. In fact the two groups are known to co-exist peacefully and the patas monkeys are often seen climbing up the branches to join their friends.

hide


 

Brown Capuchin

The brown capuchin is also known as the black-capped or tuffed capuchin. Its hair is very similar to the cowl...

read more

Brown Capuchin

The brown capuchin is also known as the black-capped or tuffed capuchin. Its hair is very similar to the cowl or capuche (French for ‘skullcap’) worn by Franciscan monks, thus its name. Extensively hunted for meat, brown capuchins are also kept as pets in many parts of the world. In some parts of the world these intelligent primates are trained to perform household tasks for people with disabilities.

hide


 

Sulawesi Crested Macaque

These macaques are very social and can often be seen spending their day grooming one another...

read more

Sulawesi Crested Macaque

These macaques are very social and can often be seen spending their day grooming one another. Sulawesi Macaques have many ways of communicating. They will often call to one another, bare their teeth, and smack their lips together. They have also been known to greet each other by sniffing each other’s rear ends and embracing.

hide


 

Douc Langur

Natives of Vietnam, their beautiful multi-coloured coats and orange-coloured face distinguish this species...

read more

Douc Langur

Natives of Vietnam, their beautiful multi-coloured coats and orange-coloured face distinguish this species. Highly endangered due to forest destruction caused by the Vietnam War, these shy creatures require thick vegetation in their exhibit. The environment helps with their procreation - they have successfully given birth to over 25 babies at the Zoo over the years.

hide


 

South American Arapaima

Look down into the murky waters in the moats and you might be able to see our wide variety of fishes. See if you...

read more

South American Arapaima

Look down into the murky waters in the moats and you might be able to see our wide variety of fishes. See if you can spot the carnivorous South American arapaima. This living fossil is one of the largest freshwater fish in the world. In the wild, arapaimas hunt other fish and occasionally prey on small birds near the water’s surface.

 

hide