Exhibits Red River Hogs White Tiger Elephants of Asia Proboscis Monkey Free-Ranging Orang Utan Pygmy Hippo Otter Tapir Sun Bear Chimpanzee Sungei Buaya Naked Mole Rat
Zones Frozen Tundra Wild Africa Fragile Forest Australasia Great Rift Valley of Ethiopia Treetops Trail Gibbon Island Primate Kingdom Reptile Garden Tortoise Shell-ter Tropical Crops & Orchid Garden

Wild Africa

Fashioned after the grassy plains in Africa, this south-eastern flank of the Zoo has grass-grazing mammals living alongside their deadly predators.

There’s nothing like the thrill of traversing through Wild Africa on a safari tour especially when hooves, horns and claws aren’t all you can expect to see. For instance, there’s a little colony of animals you might want to check out. Meet our East African’s underground darlings who feel no pain.

Singapore Zoo’s first giraffe calf in 28 years was born on 31 August 2015 to mom Roni and dad Growie. Standing at 1.9m at birth, this baby boy is the tallest SG50 Jubilee baby! Come meet him and the rest of his skyscraper family at their Wild Africa exhibit.

Follow Updates On The Baby Giraffe’s Development

 

 

White Rhinoceros

Holding the title of the second largest land mammal, a white rhinoceros can charge at 50 kilometres per hour...

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White Rhinoceros

Holding the title of the second largest land mammal, a white rhinoceros can charge at 50 kilometres per hour. That’s as fast as a city car!  Couple that with their famous horns and you won’t want to stand in the way!

There are only about 7,500 – 8,500 white rhinoceros in the wild today. They are hunted for their horns which are thought in some cultures to have healing abilities, but are scientifically unproven. We can do our part to curb their demise by not buying and discouraging others from purchasing any rhino horn products.

These gentle giants are great fun to feed with their wide square lips. Experience it for yourself, first hand, when you hand-feed them during the daily token feeding session at 1.15pm.

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Cheetah

Famed for being the fastest animal on land, the cheetah can go from zero to 60 kilometres per hour in three strides...

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Cheetah

Famed for being the fastest animal on land, the cheetah can go from zero to 60 kilometres per hour in three strides. At top speed of 112 kilometres per hour and non-retractable claws that act like spikes on running shoes, you can say these fast cats are natural born sprinters!

In the Zoo, our cheetahs are given room to roam. Their spacious exhibit is furnished with plenty of low lying branches and fallen trunks for the cheetahs to rest on, as they would in the wild.

Head to the cheetah observation hut where a clear glass window allows you to get a really close look at the cheetahs. Here you can observe their famous black ‘tear lines’ that run around the eyes all the way down to the corners of their mouths. These distinctive markings distinguish them from the leopard and jaguar. The tear lines also function to block out glare from the sun in the blistering savannah grasslands.

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African Painted Dog

The blotchy markings of various colours on an African wild dog’s fur earn it the nickname “painted wolf”...

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African Painted Dog

The blotchy markings of various colours on an African painted dog’s fur earn it the nickname “painted wolf”. Their unique fur provides them excellent camouflage. In fact, you might have a tough time spotting them in their exhibit as these masters of camouflage keep themselves well hidden.

One of the most noticeable characteristics of the African painted dogs is their large rounded ears. This useful feature not only keeps them cool in the extreme heat of their natural habitats, they give these hunters excellent hearing as well. Shaking them off is a huge challenge too as they can run steadily for as far as 5 kilometres during a hunt. A lot of times their prey drop dead from exhaustion!

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Zebra

The zebra’s striking black and white stripes make it one of the most distinct inhabitants of the African savannah...

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Zebra

The zebra’s striking black and white stripes make it one of the most distinct inhabitants of the African savannah. It has been suggested that the stripes of zebras protect the animals by confusing predators and making them less distinct as individuals when in a herd.

Over at our zebra exhibit, the herd of zebras often graze for many hours each day, using their strong front teeth to clip off the tips of the grass. Their back teeth then crush and grind the food. As they spend a large part of their time chewing, the zebra’s teeth get worn out easily, so their teeth keep growing all their lives.

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Giraffe

Giraffes are well-known the world over because of their height, thanks to their super long necks...

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Giraffe

Giraffes are well-known the world over because of their height, thanks to their super long necks. Their attractive appearance and gentle demeanour also easily make them one of the most popular animals.

The giraffe exhibit lets you get amazingly close to them. You can enjoy viewing advantages – one from the ground and another from a raised platform. Definitely close enough to make eye contact with them and see their beautiful long lashes!

Other than their necks, the giraffe also has the longest tongue in the animal kingdom. It can extend its tongue to a record length of 53 centimeters, functioning like a ‘hand’ for grasping leaves. Experience this firsthand when they wrap their long dark tongues around their snacks during the token feeding session at 10.45am, 1.35pm and 3.30pm daily!

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African Lion

The king of the jungle awaits you as he guards over his kingdom from his throne on one of the vantage...

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African Lion

The king of the jungle awaits you as he guards over his kingdom from his throne on one of the vantage points in Wild Africa. Surrounded by a pride of lionesses in their habitat, the African lion sanctuary recreates the scene of a lush clearing in the woods surrounded by a moat. Step up for a whisker-close view of the big cats from our indoor viewing gallery where you can see them guarding their territory undaunted by the curious human eyes observing them. The lions and lionesses may not need to hunt in the Zoo but you can still witness their aggression during the token feeding session at 1.40pm daily.

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Meerkat

We’ve got a “guard” on duty here in the form of our clan of meerkats. Male meerkats are responsible for sentry...

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Meerkat

We’ve got a “guard” on duty here in the form of our clan of meerkats. Male meerkats are responsible for sentry duty, taking turns to keep watch while the others forage. At the sandy terrains of the meerkat exhibit, you will usually be able to see at any one point in time, a meerkat standing upright, on a rock or branch, as its “guard post” to get a better view.

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